Workshops

A series of stimulating workshops will be held at SocInfo’16 on November 14th. Below is a brief description of each of them. Please check the individual workshop webpages for more detailed information about the call for papers and deadlines for submissions.

Workshop on Data Visualization

The ‘Actionable Images’ workshop focuses on social scientific visualisation technologies for non-programmers. The workshop is intended to provide a forum for discussion of current and emerging social scientific visualisation technologies, practices, and theory; and for practical demonstrations of toolkits pitched at non-programmers. This SocInfo conference workshop is designed to be attractive to social scientists by shifting emphasis on the methodology and technology needed in the field of computational social science to focus on the applications and immediate research wins from easy to use, end user friendly tools. Our long-term research objectives are to develop technical mastery among social scientists by building easy to use powerful tools. We envision this SocInfo workshop as a venue for researchers who cross the methodological boundaries between informatics and social sciences to identify and answer important research questions. We will be welcoming two types of submissions for the workshop: short papers (8 pages maximum), and A1 posters.

Organizers:

  • Daniel Angus (The University of Queensland)
  • Anushka Anand (Tableau Research)
  • Katy Pearce (University of Washington)
  • Marc Smith (Social Media Research Foundation)

Website: https://socinfovis.wordpress.com/

Workshop on Virality and Memetics

Organizers:

  • William H Hsu (Kansas State)
  • Kim Knight (Texas Dallas)
  • Josh Weeser (Kansas State)

Workshop on Cultural Analytics

The Culture Analytics Working Group invites proposals for papers to be part of a day-long workshop on Culture Analytics at this year’s International Conference on Social Informatics. Previous workshops have focused on the intersections of text and media, on UX design, on multi-scale data-driven models, and mathematical analyses of cultural expressive forms. Studies have been drawn from information sciences, mathematics, history, linguistics, literary studies, and folklore studies. Those studies have focused on semantic analyses of socio-textual domains,
used models to reveal how texts reflect and refract larger socio-cultural formations, and tracked cultural dynamics over time and space using data drawn from novels and other digitized historical texts, the web and social media, Instagram and other non-textual archives among others. For this sixth workshop, the organizers invite proposals for papers on any topic that features culture as a transactional form of human behavior that can be modeled and analyzed using algorithmic approaches.

Organizers:

  • John Laudun (University of Louisiana)
  • Ekaterina Lapina-Kratasyuk (National Research University Higher School of Economics)
  • Leon Gurevitch (University of Victoria at Wellington)

Website: http://culture-analytics.com/cfp-socinfo-2016/

Workshop on Activity-based Networks

Communities in the fields of health, social sciences, and computer and information sciences have recently become interested in online and mobile applications dedicated to improving health­ related behavior. Researchers studying these topics focus on everything from software and hardware development to understanding and modeling the social exchange and peer influence on these new platforms. These activity­ based social networks are important environments for improving the health and wellbeing of individuals; they also offer numerous opportunities for use by the broader medical community. The Center for Disease Control (CDC), for example, has identified a series of issues related to improving an individual’s health­ related behavior, including “encouragement, support, or companionship from family and friends” all of which are supported in popular activity­-based networks. Building on the combination of technological foundations, health implications and emergent social dynamics, this workshop looks to bring together researchers from across variety of disparate disciplines to share current findings and help build a community around this engaging new area of research.

Organizers:

  • Zack Almquist (University of Minnesota )
  • Emma S. Spiro (University of Washington)

Website: http://www.activity-networks.com/

Workshop on Social Media for Older Adults

More older adults are online and using social media than ever before. To meet the understand the needs, challenges, and potential in older adults using social media, we are invite an interdisciplinary papers on the topic of social media and older adults.

Organizers:

  • Shannon Mejía (University of Michigan)
  • Hyunggu Jung (University of Washington)
  • Beenish M. Chaudhry (University of Notre Dame)

Website: http://smoa2016.weebly.com/

Workshop on Urban Homelessness and Wise Cities

This workshop aims into bringing together researchers and practitioners to explore how we can apply urban data science to the challenges of urban homelessness in cities across the nation. If smart cities emphasize infrastructure and efficiency, wise cities emphasize improving services to in turn improve the lives of citizens. We aim to shift the discussion from smart to wise cities. The interdisciplinary focus aims to welcome diverse researchers from across the computational, urban, and social sciences. We are seeking multi-disciplinary contributions that reveal interesting aspects that advance our understanding of homelessness and efforts to address this critical challenge in cities across the nation and the world. We welcome a broad range of contributions, including insights gained from new data sources, new applications of computational methods to existing data sources, new applications of social science methodologies to understand the effectiveness of socio-technical systems, or new use of social concepts in the design of relevant information systems.

Organizers:

  • Thaisa Way (University of Washington)
  • Bill Howe (University of Washington)
  • Mahesh Somashekhar (University of Washington)

Website: http://urban.uw.edu/index.php/events/details/urban-homelessness-and-wise-cities-workshop

Workshop on Web, Social Media and Cellphone Data for Demographic Research

Demography has been a data-driven discipline since its birth. The global spread of the Internet, social media and cell phones opens up new opportunities for understanding traditional demographic research questions. At the same time, the use of social media and the Internet can influence people’s demographic behavior at a wide range of scales–from the planning of major life events like childbirth and migration, to daily decisions like commuting patterns and kin interactions. There are clear benefits to connecting demography and data science. As ever more complex population-level data become available, demography can offer rigorously-developed concepts, measures and methods to those involved in the ‘big social data’ revolution. As social media services become a major source of social scientific data, the interaction with data science holds great potential to advance demographic research as well. This workshop is intended to foster communication and exchange between the communities of population researchers and data scientists. It revolves around the main theme of applications and implications of Web, social media and cellphone data for demographic research.

Organizers:

  • Dennis Feehan (University of California, Berkeley)
  • Emilo Zagheni (University of Washington)

Website: http://projects.demog.berkeley.edu/socinfo2016/

Workshop on Computational Approaches to Social Modeling

Modern life is infused with a myriad of gadgets and new technologies that are quickly becoming online extensions of our offline lives. How we interact with others, where we are and where we go are all facets that are increasingly captured with ever greater detail by our online tools and gadgets. Digital traces constantly produced by these tools create hitherto unseen possibilities for the study of human behavior, but also pose their own challenges. The avalanche of data we are witnessing demands new tools and concepts to be analyzed and the new problems that are within our reach demand new algorithms and models to be developed. The 4th edition of this workshop aims to continue to bring together practitioners of both computer science and social science so that both may better understand the challenges faced by each other and how best they may collaborate to overcome them

Organizers:

  • Bruno Gonçalves (New York University)
  • Nicola Perra (Greenwich University)
  • Andrea Baronchelli (City University London)

Website: http://chasmws.weebly.com